Author Topic: Harp  (Read 3207 times)

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Offline Sorloc

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Re: Harp
« Reply #20 on: July 18, 2008, 11:58:32 AM »
There is an excellent point.

Coming from dnd, HARP is full of new and exciting concepts, the rules system isn't nearly as flawed and unworkable as dnd's.  EVERYONE has a 'House Rules' book for their dnd game, and it's often as thick as the PHB.  HARP, on the other hand, is a much tighter system, and doesn't *require* a bunch of house rules to play - it is playable as is, out of the box.  A GM doesn't have to be wary of munchkin combos hidden in the system.  The combat is much more interesting, you can manke characters you never could in dnd, unless you created your own Prestige class (which most everyone seems to do).

Yes, compared to dnd, it's a tremendous step up, and allows you mind-boggling flexibility.

If you're coming to it from RM, however (and this is based on the assumption that you *like* RM), it suffers from comparison.  In my opinion, people who choose to play RM do so because they WANT lots of skills, they WANT detailed combat.  With my background, looking at HARP was like looking at many other games. There are (or were) lots of games with one-roll combat resolution, with fewer, shall we say, complexities, than RM.  Personally, I had chosen to play RM *because* of those complexities, not in spite of them.

RM2 and RMSS are both fine systems.  I played and GMed RM2 for nearly 10 years before switching to RMSS, and that was nearly 10 years ago.
That means that the 'new and exciting' expansions and supplements for HARP look strangely familiar to me.  That's not intended to deningrate them, certainly they will improve that game as they did RM.  Heck, I bought all the RM supplements, and have used at least *something* out of every single one of them.  However, the only books for RM that I have used *everything* out of are Arms Law, Spell Law, and Companion 2. (sheesh... shouldn't the main Rulebook be on that list?)


To Original Post:
No, you're not missing anything.  If (as you state) you have several years of RM experience, there's very little there to surprise you.  HARP is RM, redesigned and streamlined to make it easier to play and run.  It is also easier to customize, and might allow the possibility of doing something other than fantasy (don't know, never looked at HARP SciFi).
If you thought RM was too complex, had too much chart reference, too much math and bookkeeping, then HARP may be your thing.

One thing, though - HARP's magic system is intriguing.  You learn basic spells, then tweak them for various effects common to the base spell.
It's kind of like a cross between Ars Magica and Rolemaster, except there's no common theme in the base spells you are working with, any more than there was in RM.  If that's changed in the past few years, sorry, but that's how my book is written.

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Offline Sorloc

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Re: Harp
« Reply #21 on: July 18, 2008, 12:05:50 PM »
I don't think they have changed much just pooled everything together and organized it properly, which should make it a very good product.

They did pool much from the various games that used the basic system, but also excised stuff that didn't work well together.  The combat system is still very much the same as in RuneQuest, circa 1979 - attack roll vs parry roll, weapon damage vs parrying weapon armor, then hit location armor, then hit location Hit Points. 

The design is such that you'll be able to use setting like game modules and play Call of Cthulhu or RQ or Ancient Greece or Old West or Modern Esionage or SciFi without altering your basic system.  You'll add or remove skills or skill sets, you'll add or remove various Powers (psions, magic, superpowers, etc).  Hopefully, these will stay common to a given released setting, so might reduce power creep.

Quote
For me, RMC is the future, even if it is a rework from the past,...
:D :D :D

That's a good quote...  :D

"Terrible what passes for a ninja these days" -- Pops Racer (John Goodman), Speed Racer (2008)
"How hard can it be?" -- Indiana Jones (Harrison Ford), Temple of Doom (1984)

Offline CroakerDogBoy

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Re: Harp
« Reply #22 on: July 18, 2008, 01:08:54 PM »
Thanks a lot all. That was really the information I was looking for. I kind of had an inkling of what was affirmed, but I wanted to know for sure before I went down that path.

I haven't looked at RMC because I played RM2 and MERP for so long. I just assumed that it was the same product just with a lot of the confusion cleared up.

I do like complexity. I seem to be a minority, but I had a post on the Rolemaster site wanting to use Aftermath style hit locations (30 different locations) to do my own armor by the piece, as well as a different crit table (Krush, Slash etc) for each of the possible locations. (That's really only 15 owing to left/right). People didn't seem to enthused. But I love the idea of "D Slash crit to the Right Foot, your boot is ruined and you lose three toes."

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Offline Ancientminded87

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Re: Harp
« Reply #23 on: July 27, 2010, 01:55:22 AM »
I can haz a question? When using a weapon style how do bonuses to weapon skills (a fighters combat bonus, magic weapons, so on....) affect that?
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